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EVI Releases the Global EV Outlook 2015

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

EVI Releases the Global EV Outlook 2015

Presenting insights and essential data from the world’s key EV markets, Global EV Outlook 2015 reports on positive trends for global EV deployment between 2008 and 2014, including strong investment, rising sales and stock totals, expanded infrastructure for EV charging, and improvements in battery cost and density.

The Clean Energy Ministerial’s Electric Vehicles Initiative (EVI) has released the Global EV Outlook 2015, which provides a unique global perspective on the rapidly growing EV market. Presenting insights and essential data from the world’s key EV markets, Global EV Outlook 2015 reports on positive trends for global EV deployment over the past 7 years, including strong investment, rising sales and stock totals, expanded infrastructure for EV charging, and improvements in battery cost and density. The Global EV Outlook represents the collective effort of 7 years of primary data gathering and analysis by the EVI’s 16 member governments, which together accounted for more than 95% of global EV stock in 2014.

Because transportation accounts for about one-fifth of global energy use, EVs represent one of the most promising pathways to increase energy security, reduce carbon emissions, and improve air quality. Announcing the report at the 2015 The Cars of Tomorrow conference, Tali Trigg, an Energy Analyst from the International Energy Agency (IEA) and coordinator of the Global EV Outlook 2015, noted that the document offers a needed snapshot of current progress in the context of longer-term goals. “The electrification of our vehicle fleet is a long-term ambition with interim milestones we need to hit along the way,” he explained. “The Global EV Outlook 2015 data update helps us understand where we are on this road, and where we are heading. Today, EV deployment has grown quickly from a small base, and that is an important milestone.”

Global EV Outlook 2015 reports on a number of positive trends for global EV deployment. EVI member governments have continued to make substantial and impactful investments in research, development, and demonstration; infrastructure; and fiscal incentives. Total spending by the 16 EVI member countries equaled 16 billion USD between 2008 and 2014, which has driven significant advancements and continued growth.

Global EV stock has surged, rising from about 180,000 electric cars on the road in late 2012 to 665,000 on the road at the end of 2014. The three EVI countries with the highest percentage of global EV stock include the United States (39%), Japan (16%), and China (12%). Vehicle electrification has also gone multi-modal, with 46,000 electric buses and 235 million electric two-wheelers deployed by the end of 2014. China is a standout for this multimodal evolution, with 230 million e-bikes, 83,000 electric cars, and 36,500 e-buses on the road in 2014.

The number of EVs sold each year is growing rapidly, rising from 45,000 EVs sold in 2011 to more than 300,000 sold in 2014. EVs are also increasing their market share. In 2014, EVs represented more than 1% of new car sales in four member countries: the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and the United States.

It has also become easier for drivers to recharge their vehicles, as countries expand public charging infrastructure. Between late 2012 and 2014, the number of slow charging points has more than doubled, and the number of fast charging points has increased eightfold. There are now more than 109,000 charging points in EVI countries.

Since 2011, batteries have also made substantial gains. Battery cost has dropped by about 50%, which can help improve EV affordability. Energy density has also risen, which in turn can improve vehicle range—a key consumer concern.

Even with these advancements, significant and complex technological, financial, market, and policy challenges remain. EVI is helping address these challenges by providing a forum for global cooperation among its member governments as well as robust private-sector engagement. EVI seeks to facilitate the global deployment of at least 20 million passenger car EVs, including plug-in hybrid and fuel cell electric vehicles, by 2020. The achievements highlighted in the Global EV Outlook 2015 provide a strong foundation for EV growth.

Click to view and print the Global EV Outlook 2015

The Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) is a high-level global forum to share best practices and promote policies and programs that encourage and facilitate the transition to a global clean energy economy. CEM initiatives are based on areas of common interest among participating governments and other stakeholders and help reduce emissions, improve energy security, provide energy access, and sustain economic growth.

The Electric Vehicles Initiative (EVI) is a multi-government policy forum dedicated to accelerating the introduction and adoption of electric vehicles worldwide. EVI currently includes 16 member governments from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America, as well as participation from the IEA.

Contact

CEMSecretariat@hq.doe.gov