Search
► Stay Connected

Clean Energy Ministerial 3 (CEM3)

25–26 April 2012, London, UK

Large-Scale Efficiency Programs
2:15 pm–3:45 pm
25 April 2012

Overview

Governments and energy regulators are increasingly turning to energy providers to deliver large-scale energy efficiency programs because of their strategic position in energy markets. Energy providers can help access energy savings in diffuse markets, particularly from smaller end users that otherwise might not invest in energy efficiency. In addition, energy providers offer the financial capacity and institutional stability to deliver efficiency programs at scale. There is also a growing set of large-scale energy efficiency programs that are delivered through channels other than energy providers. Participants in this session considered key design elements of large-scale energy efficiency programs, both those delivered through energy providers and through other channels.

Discussion Topics

Participants considered the following key questions in addressing this topic:

  • What are the most effective policies and mandates to mobilize energy providers to deliver energy efficiency?
  • What alternatives are there to deliver end-use energy efficiency, other than programs administered by energy providers directly?
  • What "public" funding mechanisms and sources of capital (e.g., energy provider funding, regulated revenues, treasury revenues, and carbon revenues) can be tapped to leverage private customer financing of energy efficiency?
  • What are the chief program design lessons from global experience to best mobilize both energy customers and delivery agents?
  • What are the big picture issues for the public sector to engage with the private sector on energy efficiency?
  • What are some potential areas for public-private coordination?

Objective

The objective for the discussion was to identify a set of smart policies and regulatory mechanisms to mobilize energy efficiency at a large scale, including those that can be carried forth through public-private collaboration within the context of the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM).

Format

The session aimed to bring a specific subject area into focus in an interactive setting. There were no speeches, but rather a moderated conversation in which all of the approximately 25 participants from the public and private sectors were encouraged to share their views. This was a private discussion held under the Chatham House Rule.

Session Structure

2:15–2:20: Moderator’s Opening Remarks and Scene Setter
The moderator described the scope of the discussion, set expectations on the time limits for individual comments, provided an overview of the three segments for open discussion, and articulated the goals for the roundtable.
A scene setter was presented by a member of the Preparatory Expert Team:

  • Eoin Lees, Senior Adviser, Regulatory Assistance Project

2:20–2:40: Discussion on Policy Drivers
The following relevant topics were discussed:

  • What are the most effective policies to mobilize energy providers to deliver energy efficiency?
  • What alternatives are there to deliver end-use energy efficiency, other than programs administered by energy providers directly?

2:40–3:00: Discussion on Public Funding
The following relevant topic was discussed:

  • What public funding mechanisms and sources of capital (e.g., energy provider funding, regulated revenues, treasury revenues, and carbon revenues) can best be tapped to leverage private customer financing of energy efficiency?

3:00–3:15: Discussion on Delivery Issues
The following relevant topic was discussed:

  • What are the chief program design lessons from global experience to best mobilize both energy customers and delivery agents?

3:15–3:40: Discussion on Public-Private Coordination
The moderator directed the discussion toward potential follow-on actions, which followed pathways that opened up during the discussion, involved ideas developed by participants in advance, and included discussion of the newly launched CEM initiative, the 21st Century Power Partnership.

3:40–3:45: Moderator’s Closing Remarks
The moderator summarized salient points, emerging consensus areas, and follow-on actions.

Moderator

José María Figueres, President, Carbon War Room /President of Costa Rica

Government Representatives

Finland: Jyri Häkämies, Minister, Ministry of Employment and the Economy
India: B.K. Chaturvedi, Member, Energy, Planning Commission
Japan: Seishu Makino, Senior Vice Minister, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry
Mexico: Jordy Herrera, Secretary, Secretariat of Energy
United States: Steven Chu, Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy
United States: Roland Risser, Program Manager, Building Technologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy

Other Participants

Amit Bando, Executive Director, International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation
José Braz, Executive Board Member, Energy Services Regulatory Authority (Portuguese Energy Regulator)
Dale Bryk, Director, Energy and Transportation Program, Natural Resources Defense Council
Iain Campbell, Vice President and General Manager of Global Energy and Workplace Solutions, Johnson Controls Inc.
Marc Coroler, Senior Vice President, Strategic Customers and Solutions, Schneider Electric
Richard Cowart, Principal and European Programmes Director, The Regulatory Assistance Project
Brian Dames, Chief Executive Officer, Eskom Holdings Limited
Tom Delay, Chief Executive, Carbon Trust
John DiStasio, General Manager and Chief Executive Officer, Sacramento Municipal Utility District
Vijay Iyer, Director, Sustainable Energy Department, World Bank
In-Soo Kim, Executive Director, Energy Technology Headquarters, Korea Energy Management Corporation
Jessie J. Knight, Jr., Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, San Diego Gas & Electric
Alex Laskey, President and Founder, Opower
Ian Marchant, Chief Executive, SSE plc
Jeremy Oppenheim, Director, McKinsey & Company
Gene Rodrigues, Director of Customer Energy Efficiency and Solar, Southern California Edison Company
Lesley Rogers, Vice President, Efficiency NB
Bruce Smith, Business Advisor, Abu Dhabi Water & Energy Authority
Gérard Wolf, Senior Executive Vice President, International Development, EDF Group