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Clean Energy Ministerial 3 (CEM3)

25–26 April 2012, London, UK

Super-Efficient Appliances
4:15 pm–5:45 pm
25 April 2012

Overview

Promotion of efficient and super-efficient appliances can increase consumer demand, drive down product prices, and increase the energy efficiency of the market as a whole. While there are many successful policies and programs in place to incentivize the purchase of efficient and super-efficient appliances, much more can be done.
For example, consumers can be provided with more information on the life-cycle cost savings provided by energy-efficient appliances; market transformation programs, such as awards, targeted procurement, and financial incentives for efficient products, can be used more often and applied more broadly to encourage energy efficiency innovation by manufacturers; and retailers can be enlisted to promote the benefits of energy-efficient appliances to consumers.

Discussion Topics

Participants considered the following key questions in addressing this topic:

  • What are the most effective means of communicating energy use and life-cycle cost information to consumers to influence purchase decisions for energy-efficient products, and to influence behaviors to reduce energy consumption?
  • What role can private industry, particularly information technology companies, play in the delivery of innovative solutions to consumers in support of these market transformation objectives?
  • How can governments, retailers, electric utilities, and product manufacturers collaborate to design and deliver effective programs with measurable results?
  • How can awards and procurement pull super-efficient products into the market?

Objective

The objective for the discussion was to identify a set of near-term, actionable opportunities, including strengthening existing policies and programs, to help promote efficient and super-efficient appliances. Ideas for deeper public-private collaboration within the context of the Clean Energy Ministerial warranted particular attention.

Format

The session aimed to bring a specific subject area into focus in an interactive setting. There were no speeches, but rather a moderated conversation in which all of the approximately 25 participants from the public and private sectors were encouraged to share their views. This was a private discussion held under the Chatham House Rule.

Session Structure

4:154:20: Moderator’s Opening Remarks
The moderator described the scope of the discussion, set expectations on the time limits for individual comments, provided an overview of the three segments for open discussion, and articulated the goals for the roundtable.

4:204:40: Filling the Information Gap
The following relevant topics were discussed:

  • What are the most effective means of communicating energy use and life-cycle cost information to consumers to influence purchase decisions for energy-efficient products, and to influence behaviors to reduce energy consumption?
  • What role can private industry, particularly information technology companies, play in the delivery of innovative solutions to consumers in support of these market transformation objectives?

4:40–5:00: Optimizing Program Design
The following relevant topic was discussed:

  • How can governments, retailers, electric utilities, and product manufacturers collaborate to design and deliver effective programs with measurable results?

5:00–5:20: Pulling Super-Efficient Products into the Market
The following relevant topic was discussed:

  • How can awards and procurement pull super-efficient products into the market?

5:20–5:40: Opportunities for Progress
The moderator directed the discussion toward potential follow-on actions, which focused on promising pathways that were mentioned earlier in the discussion, involved ideas developed by participants in advance, and included the following:

  • Developing universal "Energy IDs" for products
  • Exchanging information to optimize program design
  • Leveraging the Super-Efficient Equipment and Appliance Deployment (SEAD) Global Efficiency Medal and bulk procurement programs to create a market pull for super-efficient appliances
  • Collaborating across strategies through the SEAD Efficient Product Promotion Collaborative

5:40–5:45: Moderator’s Closing Remarks
The moderator summarized salient points, emerging consensus areas, and follow-on actions.

Moderator

Christine Egan, Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer, Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program

Government Representatives

Germany: Stefan Kapferer, State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology
India: Montek Singh Ahluwalia, Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission
Korea: Seok Cho, Vice Minister, Ministry of Knowledge Economy
Sweden: Anna-Karin Hatt, Minister, Ministry of Enterprise, Energy and Communications
United States: Steven Chu, Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy
United States: Gina McCarthy, Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
United States: Roland Risser, Program Manager, Building Technologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy

Other Participants

Bruno Berthon, Global Managing Director for Sustainability Services, Accenture
Jan Brockmann, Chief Technology Officer, Electrolux
Dale Bryk, Director, Energy and Transportation Program, Natural Resources Defense Council
Tom Delay, Chief Executive, Carbon Trust
Keith Evans, Managing Director, Panasonic UK and Republic of Ireland, Panasonic Corporation
Nick Folland, Legal and Corporate Responsibility Director, Kingfisher
Jeffrey Harris, Senior Vice President for Programs, Alliance to Save Energy
Alex Laskey, President and Founder, Opower
Wu Ling, Secretary General, China Solid State Lighting Alliance/President, International Solid State Lighting Alliance
Ken Lowe, Co-Founder and Vice President, VIZIO Inc.
John Mollet, Vice President, International Copper Association
Mark Radka, Energy Branch Chief, Division of Technology, Industry and Economics, United Nations Environment Programme
Gene Rodrigues, Director of Customer Energy Efficiency and Solar, Southern California Edison Company