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Clean Energy Ministerial 3 (CEM3)

25–26 April 2012, London, UK

Electric Vehicles
2:15 pm–3:45 pm
25 April 2012

Overview

When charged with low-carbon electricity, electric vehicles (including plug-in hybrid vehicles) provide significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions relative to traditional vehicles. Electric vehicles also provide important energy security benefits, offering one of the most promising approaches to reducing the transportation sector’s overwhelming dependence on petroleum. Participants in this session shared ideas on how policy makers and industry can work together to reduce the cost of electric vehicles and create favorable market conditions in the short and long terms. Participants discussed policy measures and business models, and considered which are most likely to accelerate vehicle electrification.

Discussion Topics

Participants considered the following key questions in addressing this topic:

  • How can governments and industry best work together to bring down battery costs and accelerate innovation for electric vehicle technologies more broadly?
  • How important are harmonized standards (e.g., for plugs, communications protocols, and cell/module/pack geometry) for rapid growth of the electric vehicle industry? What role should governments play in promoting harmonized standards?
  • How should fuel economy and emissions standards most effectively be designed to promote electric vehicles (including plug-in hybrids)?
  • Which non-financial incentives (e.g., access to high-occupancy vehicle lanes, preferential parking, and inner city access) are most effective to spur electric vehicle demand?
  • What financial incentives (e.g., consumer or producer subsidies) are most effective?
  • What measures could be implemented to encourage electric vehicle procurement by government and corporate fleets?
  • What are the best measures to close the gap between governments’ deployment goals and manufacturers’ scale-up plans for electric vehicles?

Objective

The objective for the discussion was to identify opportunities to accelerate adoption of electric vehicles, particularly those strategies that can be carried forth through public-private collaboration within the context of the Clean Energy Ministerial.

Format

The session aimed to bring a specific subject area into focus in an interactive setting. There were no speeches, but rather a moderated conversation in which all of the approximately 25 participants from the public and private sectors were encouraged to share their views. This was a private discussion held under the Chatham House Rule.

Session Structure

2:15–2:20: Moderator’s Opening Remarks
The moderator described the scope of the discussion, set expectations on the time limits for individual comments, provided an overview of the three segments for open discussion, and articulated the goals for the roundtable.

2:20–2:55: Public-Private Collaboration
The following relevant topics were discussed:

  • How can governments and industry best work together to bring down battery costs and accelerate innovation for electric vehicle technologies more broadly?
  • What are the key areas of collaboration for government and industry to harmonize standards for electric vehicles (e.g., plugs and communications protocols) and batteries (e.g., cell/module/pack geometry and connectors, and performance assessments for secondary use)?

2:55–3:10: Procurement
The following relevant topics were discussed:

  • How important is government and corporate fleet deployment to the early growth of the electric vehicle market?
  • What measures can be implemented to encourage electric vehicle procurement by government and corporate fleets?

3:10–3:40: Policies
The following relevant topics were discussed:

  • How should fuel economy and emissions standards most effectively be designed to promote electric vehicles (including plug-in hybrids)?
  • Which non-financial incentives (e.g., access to high-occupancy vehicle lanes, preferential parking, and inner-city access) are most effective to spur electric vehicle demand?
  • What financial incentives (e.g., consumer or producer subsidies) are most effective?

3:40–3:45: Moderator’s Closing Remarks
The moderator summarized salient points, emerging consensus areas, and follow-on actions.

Moderator

David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy

Government Representatives

China: Cao Jianlin, Vice Minister, Ministry of Science and Technology
France: Éric Besson, Minister, Ministry of Economy, Finance, and Industry
Germany: Stefan Kapferer, State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology
India: Montek Singh Ahluwalia, Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission
India: Ambuj Sharma, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Heavy Industries
Russia: Timur Ivanov, Director General, Russian Energy Agency
Sweden: Anna-Karin Hatt, Minister, Ministry of Enterprise, Energy and Communications
United Kingdom: Norman Baker, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport, Department for Transport
United States: Gina McCarthy, Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Other Participants

Geoffrey E. Allison, Managing Director, Smith Electric Vehicles Europe
Thomas Becker, Vice President, Governmental Affairs, BMW Group
Jim Bruce, Vice President, Corporate Public Affairs, United Parcel Service
Federico Caleno, Head of Special Projects and Technological Development, Enel Distribuzione
Enno Fuchs, Director of E-Mobility, Opel/Vauxhall
Hou Fushen, Director of Technology Development, Society of Automotive Engineers of China
Joe Greenwell, Chairman, Ford of Britain, Ford
Philippe Klein, Executive Vice President, Corporate Planning, Product Planning, Programs, Renault
Götz Klink, Global Head of the Automotive Practice, A.T. Kearney
Takemitsu Kunio, Senior Vice President, NEC Corporation
Paul Lin, Business Director, BYD Europe, BYD Group
John Lynch, Managing Director and Head of EMEA Power, Utilities, and Renewables, Global Corporate and Investment Banking Group, Bank of America Merrill Lynch
Pete Richings, Group Chief Engineer, Hybrid Technologies, Jaguar Land Rover
Akihito Tanke, Vice President, Toyota Motor Europe, Toyota
Rong Wenwei, General Manager, Shanghai International Automobile City Group/Deputy Director, Jiading District Shanghai International Automobile City Management Committee
Steve Westly, Managing Partner, The Westly Group
Paul Wilkes, Senior Manager, Vehicle Programme and Supply Chain, Royal Mail Group